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2018 Springfield Legislative Update: Summary of New Legislation & Pending Bills

Education Publications

The following is a summary of the 2018 legislative changes affecting school districts. Click here for a PDF of the entire summary or click the links below to review the specific topics.

Vetoes and Amedatory Vetoes

Student Discipline Report/Safe Schools & Healthy Learning Environment Grant Program

Physical Education

Minimum Teacher Salaries

Withdrawal from Special Education Cooperatives

Work Ethics Curriculum

School District Report to ISBE

School Report Card to Include “Illinois Youth Survey”

Immigration Safe Zones Act

Transportation for Students Due to “Serious Hazards”

School Counselors

Referendum on Elected Lake County Assessor

Abatements for “Urban Agricultural Zones”

Mandate Waivers

ISBE Appointments

Charter School Commission 

Student Issues

Ashley’s Law

Undesignated Asthma Medication

Epinephrine Administration

Concussion Protocol

HPV Vaccine Information

Influenza Vaccine Information

Developmental and Social-Emotional Screenings

Dental Examinations

Hunger-Free Students’ Bill of Rights

In-School Suspensions

Hearing Officer Deadlines for Due Process Hearings

Denial of Enrollment and Punitive Action for Failure to Meet Attendance Standards

Compulsory Attendance

Definition of Truancy

Chronic Absences in Early Childhood

Employment

Government Severance Pay Act

Severance Agreements Due to Sexual Harassment

Student Growth in Teacher Evaluations

Return to Service, Substitute Teachers, and Qualifications

Professional Educator License

Professional Educator License – Service Members

Early Childhood Program Teachers

Principal Endorsement

Paraprofessional Educator Endorsement

Career Preservation and Student Loan Repayment Act

Substitute Teacher Requirements

Third Party Substitute Teacher

Training

Mental Health Awareness
School Resource Officers

Board of Education

School Board Elections

Oath of Office

Walking/Biking Education

Administration

Mandate Waiver Notice

Local Government Electronic Notification Act

Dual Credit Quality Act

Dual Credit

Electronic-Learning Days Pilot Program

Liquor Sales Near Schools

Human Trafficking Hotline

Curriculum

Parenting Education

Education on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault

Black History Curriculum

Transportation

Identification of School Buses

Business and Finance

Evidence Based Funding

Budget and Funding Distribution

Public Education Credit Card Affinity

Administrative Costs

Property Tax

Refunds for Erroneous Assessments

Life Care Facilities

Pensions

Defined Contribution Plan

Return to Work in Teacher Shortage Areas

Salaries Exceeding the Governor’s Salary

Vetoes and Amedatory Vetoes

VETOES AND AMEDATORY VETOES *

* These bills will be considered by the General Assembly during the veto session on November 13-15 and 27-29. Vetoes or amendatory vetoes can be overridden by a three-fifths vote in both houses. Amendatory vetoes can be accepted by a majority vote.

Student Discipline Report/Safe Schools & Healthy Learning Environment Grant Program
House Bill 4208
Amendatory Veto August 26, 2018
This legislation would have amended the section of the School Code requiring ISBE to prepare an annual report on student discipline and determine the top 20% of school districts with out-of-school suspensions, out-of-school expulsions, and racial disproportionality.  The amendment would have expanded on the requirement that school districts in the top 20% for three years submit a plan identifying strategies to reduce the use of exclusionary discipline or racial disproportionality by requiring the plan to be approved at a public board meeting within 90 days and by requiring the district to submit annual progress reports until the district is no longer in the top 20% for three consecutive years.  Additionally, the legislation would have created the Safe Schools Healthy Learning Environment Grant Program.  Subject to appropriation, this program would have provided grant funds to school districts to implement evidence-based, promising practices for restorative interventions and resolution strategies as alternatives to exclusionary discipline.  Priority for the grants would have been given to school districts in the top 20% of out-of-school suspensions, out-of-school expulsions, and racial disproportionality.

Physical Education
Senate Bill 2572
Vetoed August 19, 2018
This bill would have required 150 minutes per week of physical education, rather than 3 days per week.

Minimum Teacher Salaries
Senate Bill 2892
Vetoed August 26, 2018
The minimum full-time teacher’s salary would have been raised by this bill to $32,076 for the 2019-2020 school year, $34,576 for the 2020-2021 school year, $37,076 for the 2021-2022 school year, and $40,000 for the 2022-2023 school year. Thereafter, the minimum salary rate would have been equal the minimum salary rate for the previous school year increased by a percentage equal to the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for all items published by the United States Department of Labor for the previous school year.

Withdrawal from Special Education Cooperatives
Senate Bill 2344
Vetoed August 26, 2018
Member districts of special education joint agreements or cooperatives that wish to withdraw from the joint agreement would have been required to present to its school board and the other member districts evidence that it has a comprehensive plan for educating a wide range of students with disabilities. For districts in a county with a population exceeding 5,000,000 inhabitants that seek to withdraw from a joint agreement, a student attending a school under a joint agreement in the prior school year would have been allowed to remain in the joint agreement if the student is a resident of the withdrawing district, the joint agreement maintains the program, the student’s IEP team makes a determination that the program is the most appropriate program to the meet the student’s needs, and the student remains age appropriate for the program. The withdrawing district would have been responsible for the per capita cost of the student’s attendance, plus a per student share of fees that would have been paid to the joint agreement for costs associated with educating the student in the joint agreement and transportation of the student to the joint agreement’s program. 

Work Ethics Curriculum
House Bill 3792
Vetoed August 19, 2018
The Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act would have been amended to add the importance of developing and applying a work ethic in a variety of contexts to the model postsecondary and career expectations for public school students.

School District Report to ISBE
House Bill 5481
Vetoed August 19, 2018
By no later than day sixty (60) of instruction in each school year, school boards would have been required to report to ISBE certain information about employed teachers, pupil-teacher ratios, class instructors, and class sections for K-12 classes. ISBE would have published the information contained in the reports on its website by December 1, 2019 and annually thereafter. The legislation also stated the class size goals of the General Assembly beginning with the 2020-2021 school year.

School Report Card to Include “Illinois Youth Survey”
Senate Bill 2345
Vetoed August 19, 2018
State, school district, and school report cards would have been required to include whether or not the school has participated in the Illinois Youth Survey, which is defined to mean a self-report survey, administered every two years, designed to gather information about health and social indicators, including substance abuse patterns and the attitudes of students in grades 8, 10, and 12.

Immigration Safe Zones Act
Senate Bill 0035
Vetoed August 24, 2018
This legislation would have required the Attorney General to publish model policies limiting assistance with immigration enforcement in state-funded schools, as well as other facilities. Within 60 days of this Act becoming law, school districts would have been required to review any and all applications, questionnaires, and interview forms and remove any questions regarding citizenship or immigration status, except where required by statute, ordinance, federal law, or court order.

Transportation for Students Due to “Serious Hazards”
House Bill 5195
Amendatory Veto August 21, 2018
Section 29-3 of the School Code allows the provision of free transportation to pupils residing less than 1 1/2 miles from the school they attend where walking to or from school or a designated pick-up point would be a serious hazard to the safety of the pupil due to vehicular or rail traffic. This legislation would have added to that provision a safety hazard due to a course or pattern of criminal activity as defined in Section 10 of the Illinois Streetgang Terrorism Omnibus Prevention Act. Upon receiving a request for free transportation, school boards would have been responsible for making a determination, in consultation with local law enforcement, as to what constitutes criminal activity. ISBE would have reviewed these designations, in collaboration with local law enforcement, within 30 days after the school board submitted its finding to the State Board.

School Counselors
House Bill 4514
Amendatory Veto August 13, 2018
This bill would have limited the individuals who could use the title “school counselor” to only those persons holding a School Service Personnel license endorsed in school counseling.

Referendum on Elected Lake County Assessor
Senate Bill 2544
Amendatory Veto August 27, 2018
This legislation would have placed a binding referendum on the ballot in Lake County for the November 6, 2018 election.  The question would have been whether the office of the Chief Assessment Officer of Lake County should be converted from an appointed to an elected position. 

Abatements for “Urban Agricultural Zones”
House Bill 3418
Amendatory Veto August 20, 2018
This legislation would have added to the list of lands that can be granted a property tax abatement “Urban Agricultural Zones,” which would have been areas within a municipality’s boundaries designated through ordinance for farming in accordance with the Municipal Code.

Mandate Waivers
House Bill 1262
Vetoed August 17, 2018
This bill would have required waiver requests involving tax rates (Section 17-2), interfund transfers (Section 17-2A), uses of operations and maintenance funds (Section 17-7, or uses of transportation funds (Section 17-8) to be considered by the full General Assembly.

ISBE Appointments
House Bill 4284
Vetoed August 19, 2018
This bill would have required three members of the Illinois State Board of Education to represent the “educator community.”

Charter School Commission
House Bill 5175
The State Charter School Commission would have lost the authority to reverse a local school board’s decision to deny, revoke, or not renew a charter.  Charter school applicants would have been allowed by the bill to seek judicial review of a local school board’s decision in circuit court. 

Student Issues

Ashley’s Law
Public Act 100-0660
Effective August 1, 2018
Parents, guardians, and other registered designated caregivers may administer medical cannabis infused products to eligible students at school or on the school bus. The student must be a registered qualifying patient under the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program. The parent, guardian, or designated caregiver must also have a registry identification card. The medical cannabis product must be removed from the school or school bus after administration. No school employee can be required to administer the medical cannabis product, and a parent or guardian may not administer the medical cannabis product in a manner that, in the opinion of the school district or school, would disrupt the school’s educational environment or expose other students to the product. A school district may not discipline a student who is administered a medical cannabis product and may not deny the student’s eligibility to attend school because the student requires administration of the product.  However, a school district is prohibited from authorizing the use of a medical cannabis product if the district would lose federal funding as a result.

Undesignated Asthma Medication
Public Act 100-0726
Effective January 1, 2019
School districts, public schools, charter schools, or private schools may authorize a school nurse or other trained personnel to provide undesignated asthma medication to students for self-administration. Prior to the administration of undesignated asthma medication, trained personnel must submit to the school’s administration proof of completion of a training program.  The training must be completed annually and the school must maintain records relating to the training curriculum and trained personnel.  The school nurse or trained personnel may also provide undesignated asthma medication to any personnel authorized under a student’s health care action plan, asthma action plan, 504 plan, or IEP to administer asthma medication to the student that meets the student’s prescription on file. The school nurse or trained personnel may also carry undesignated asthma medication on his or her person while in school or at a school sponsored activity and administer undesignated asthma medication to any person that the school nurse or trained personnel believes in good faith is having respiratory distress while in school, at a school-sponsored activity, under the supervision of school personnel, or before or after normal school activities.

Within 24 hours after the administration of undesignated asthma medication, a school must notify the student’s parent, guardian, or emergency contact, as well as the physician who provided the standing protocol and prescription for the undesignated asthma medication of its use. The school must follow up with the school nurse, if available, and may, with the consent of the parent or guardian, notify the child’s health care provider of record. Within three (3) days after administration of undesignated asthma medication by a school nurse, other trained personnel, or a student, the school must also report to the State Board of Education.  This Act further requires training be completed annually in recognizing and responding to respiratory distress and outlines the requirements of such training.  Finally, the Act clarifies that a school may maintain a supply of asthma medication in any secure location that is accessible before, during, and after school where a person is most at risk, including a classroom or nurse’s office.

Epinephrine Administration
Public Act 100-0799
Effective January 1, 2019
The School Code provision governing the self-administration and self-carry of epinephrine in school, as well as the administration of undesignated epinephrine, applies to both auto injectors and pre-filled syringes (previously, it only applied to auto injectors). The law otherwise remains the same.

Concussion Protocol
Public Act 100-0747
Effective January 1, 2019
ISBE is required to adopt rules governing accommodating students who may have sustained concussions during interscholastic athletic activities. The Department of Public Health will develop, publish, and disseminate a brochure on the effects of concussions in children and how to identify concussion warning signs. This brochure must be distributed by schools to any child, or the parent or guardian of such child, who may have sustained a concussion, regardless of whether the concussion occurred while the child was participating in an interscholastic activity.

HPV Vaccine Information
Public Act 100-0741
Effective January 1, 2019
Beginning January 1, 2020, the Department of Public Health must provide all students (including male students) who are entering sixth grade and their parents or guardians with information about the availability of the HPV vaccine.

Influenza Vaccine Information
Public Act 100-0977
Effective January 1, 2019
School boards are required to provide informational materials regarding influenza and meningococcal disease, and the vaccinations for each, to parents and guardians of students. The Department of Public Health will develop, provide, or approve and publish these materials.

Developmental and Social-Emotional Screenings
Public Act 100-1011
Effective August 21, 2018
The Department of Public Health must develop rules and appropriate revisions to the Child Health Examination form by January 1, 2019 with respect to age-appropriate developmental screening and social and emotional screening.

Dental Examinations
Public Act 100-0829
Effective January 1, 2019
In addition to kindergarten, second, and sixth grade students, ninth grade students of any public, private, or parochial school must have a dental examination.

Hunger-Free Students’ Bill of Rights
Public Act 100-1092
Effective August 26, 2018
Every public or private elementary or secondary school that participates in the federal child nutrition program must provide a federally reimbursable meal or snack to a student who requests such, regardless of the student’s ability to pay for the meal or snack. Schools cannot publicly identify or stigmatize students who cannot pay for a meal or snack or who owe money for a meal or snack. Where a student owes money for meals or snacks in excess of the cost of five lunches (or a lower amount determined by the school), the school may contact the parent or guardian to attempt collection and request that the child be enrolled in a federal or state nutrition program. If the student owes $500 or more to the district for meals or snacks, and the district has made reasonable attempts to collect the debt for at least one year, the district may seek an offset under the State Comptroller Act.

In-School Suspensions
Public Act 100-1035
Effective August 22, 2018
This Act provides that, beginning with the 2018-2019 school year, an in-school suspension program for any student in kindergarten through grade 12 may focus on promoting non-violent conflict resolution and positive interactions with other students and school personnel. Further, a school district may employ a school social worker or licensed mental health professional to oversee in-school suspension programs. 

Hearing Officer Deadlines for Due Process Hearings
Public Act 100-0849
Effective August 14, 2018
The timeline for a hearing officer in a due process hearing to issue his or her written decision is changed from “within 10 days” to “within 10 calendar days, excluding Saturday, Sunday, or any State holiday, after the conclusion of the hearing.”

Denial of Enrollment and Punitive Action for Failure to Meet Attendance Standards
Public Act 100-0825
Effective August 13, 2018
Districts may only deny enrollment to students 17 years of age or older for one semester for failure to meet minimum attendance standards (where certain conditions are met), not also for failure to meet academic standards, as previously allowed. A truant minor may not be expelled for nonattendance unless the student has accrued 15 consecutive days of absences without valid cause and either the student cannot be located by the district or the district cannot, after exhausting all available support services, compel the student to return to school.

Compulsory Attendance
Public Act 100-0810
Effective January 1, 2019
A school district may not refer a truant minor to any other local public entity for that entity to issue a fine or fee as punishment for truancy. However, a school district may refer any person having custody over a truant minor to any other local public entity to issue a fine or fee for the child’s truancy if the school district’s truant officer, the regional office of education, or an intermediate service center has been notified of the truant behavior and the district has provided all appropriate and available supportive services to the child.  Appropriate and available services include meeting with the homeless liaison if the child is homeless, meeting with the relevant school personnel if the child has a documented disability, or completing an evaluation of eligibility for special education services. 

Definition of Truancy
Public Act 100-0918
Effective July 1, 2018
A child who is subject to compulsory school attendance but is absent without valid cause for more than 1% but less than 5% of the past 180 days is a truant. Previously, a child subject to compulsory school attendance who was absent without valid cause for a school day or portion of a school day met the definition of truant.

Chronic Absences in Early Childhood
Public Act 100-0819
Effective July 1, 2019
Beginning July 1, 2019, publicly funded early childhood programs must collect and review their chronic absence data and determine what systems of support and resources are needed to engage chronically absent students and their families to encourage the habit of daily attendance and promote success. This data must be reported to ISBE by July 1, 2020, and annually thereafter. Schools are encouraged to support students who are at risk of chronic absence, to make resources available to families to ensure daily program attendance, and to include information about chronic absenteeism as part of their preschool to kindergarten transition resources. Chronic absence is defined as absences that total 10% or more of school days of the most recent academic year.  

Employment

Government Severance Pay Act
Public Act 100-0895
Effective January 1, 2019
Beginning January 1, 2019, this new law requires units of government, including school districts, to include in all new contracts or employment agreements, or renewals or renegotiations of an existing contract or employment agreement, provisions limiting severance pay to no more than 20 weeks and a prohibition on severance pay when employment is terminated for misconduct.  The act defines misconduct to include conscious disregard of the employer’s interests, gross negligence, chronic absenteeism, willful and deliberate violation of regulations or the employer’s rules, and other conduct such as criminal acts.

Severance Agreements Due to Sexual Harassment
Public Act 100-1040
Effective August 23, 2018
The Local Records Act has been amended to require that when a school district or other local taxing agency enters a severance agreement because the employee was found to have engaged in sexual harassment or sexual discrimination, the following information must be published on the district’s website and be made available to the news media within 72 hours of its approval: (1) full name and title of person receiving severance payment; (2) the amount of the payment; (3) that the person was found to have engaged in sexual harassment or sexual discrimination; and (4) the date, time and location of the meeting at which the severance agreement was approved.  The information may be withheld if disclosure would: (1) interfere with pending or reasonably contemplated law enforcement proceedings; (2) interfere with pending or reasonably contemplated legal or administrative proceedings instigated by the complainant; (3) result in direct or indirect disclosure of a complainant who has not consented to his or her identification; or (4) endanger the life or physical safety of the complainant.  The statute also states both that its requirements do not supersede the confidentiality provisions of the severance agreement and that it does not limit disclosure of public records required under the Freedom of Information Act.

Student Growth in Teacher Evaluations
Public Act 100-0768
Effective January 1, 2019
Local school districts have been required to create a joint committee to incorporate the use of data and indicators of student growth as a factor in rating teacher performance in teacher evaluation plans. This new law requires the committee to meet no less than one time per year to assess and review the effectiveness of a district’s evaluation plan for the purpose of continuous improvement of instruction and evaluation practices. The law has also been clarified to state specifically that the Open Meetings Act does not apply to the meetings of this joint committee.

Return to Service, Substitute Teachers and Qualifications
Public Act 100-0596
Effective July 1, 2018
For TRS annuitants, the number of days they may accept employment as a teacher without impacting their retirement status has been increased to 120 days or 600 paid hours through June 30, 2020.  However, there can be no more than 100 days in the same classroom. For substitute teachers, from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023, ISBE may issue a Short-Term Substitute Teaching License. Further, each school board must now develop a short-term substitute teacher training program for individuals holding a short-term substitute teaching license. However, a school district may not require an individual who holds a valid professional educator license or educator license with stipulations to seek or hold a substitute teaching license to teach as a substitute teacher.  Regarding qualifications, the Act clarifies that teaching applicants trained in another country must meet certain requirements to receive a Professional Educator License endorsed in a school support personnel area. Finally, the Act sets forth the requirements for any applicant who has not completed an Illinois-approved educator preparation program at an Illinois institution of higher education to obtain a Professional Educator License endorsed in a teaching field or school support personnel area.

Professional Educator License
Public Act 100-0932
Effective August 17, 2018
Students seeking a Professional Educator License or an Educator License with Stipulations will no longer be required to complete ISBE’s recognized test of basic skills prior to the semester before student teaching or the semester preceding the final semester of an internship.

Professional Educator License – Service Members
Public Act 100-0821
Effective September 3, 2018
Members of the United States Armed Forces or the National Guard, or their spouses, who obtain a Professional Educator License with Stipulations with a provisional educator endorsement may validly hold such a license for three years, provided that any remaining testing and coursework deficiencies are met.

Early Childhood Program Teachers
Public Act 100-0645
Effective July 27, 2018
Through the 2023-2024 school year, individuals are eligible to teach preschool children in an early childhood program if: (1) they hold a Professional Educator License with an early childhood education endorsement; (2) they hold a Professional Educator License with short-term approval for early childhood education; (3) they are pursuing a Professional Educator License and hold an ECE Credential Level of 5 from the Department of Human Services; (4) they are pursuing a Professional Educator License, hold an Educator License with Stipulations with a transitional bilingual educator endorsement, and have either passed an early childhood education content test or have completed no less than nine semester hours of postsecondary coursework in the area of early childhood education.

Principal Endorsement
Public Act 100-0780
Effective January 1, 2019
The persons who are eligible for a Principal Endorsement now include those meeting the prior standards plus those meeting the prior standards and having at least four total years teaching or working in the capacity of school support personnel in a school under the supervision of the Department of Corrections.

Paraprofessional Educator Endorsement
Public Act 100-0772
Effective August 10, 2018
Beginning July 1, 2018, the license renewal fee for an Educator License with Stipulations with a paraprofessional educator endorsement is $25.

Career Preservation and Student Loan Repayment Act
Public Act 100-0872
Effective August 14, 2018
Failure to perform on a student loan or scholarship provided by or guaranteed by the Illinois Student Assistance Commission or any Illinois government agency is not grounds to deny, non-renew, suspend, revoke, or engage in any disciplinary action upon a professional or occupation license.

Substitute Teacher Requirements
Public Act 100-0855
Effective August 14, 2018
School boards may now require new substitute teachers to provide evidence of physical fitness to perform assigned duties. Evidence may consist of a physical examination not more than 90 days before the time of presentation to the board, and the cost of such examination rests with the substitute teacher.  New and existing substitute teachers may also be subject to additional health examinations, including screening for tuberculosis.  If a new or existing substitute teacher is required to have an additional examination, the school district must pay for the examination.

Third Party Substitute Teacher
Public Act 100-0813
Effective August 13, 2018
By January 1, 2019, ISBE must implement a program through which eligible school districts will be able to supplement their substitute teacher recruitment with the use of recruiting firms. To qualify for the program, a school district must demonstrate that because of the severity of its substitute teacher shortage, it is unable to find an adequate amount of substitute or retired teachers and has exhausted all other efforts.  Districts are prohibited from using recruiting firms to circumvent collective bargaining agreements or laws, from using recruiting firms in the event of a strike, and from reducing the number of full-time staff members as a result of using such firms. Recruiting firms may enter into agreements with unions that have a collective bargaining agreement with a given district. Substitute teachers hired from a recruiting firm do not receive service credit under the Pension Code and are not included within the definitions of either a teacher or substitute teacher under the School Code.

Training

Mental Health Awareness
Public Act 100-0903
Effective January 1, 2019
The requirement that certain school personnel receive training on identifying the warning signs of mental illness and suicidal behavior in youth has been extended to include all licensed school personnel and administrators working with pupils in kindergarten through grade 12. This training must happen at least once every two years.

School Resource Officers
Public Act 100-0984
Effective January 1, 2019
The Illinois Law Enforcement Training Standards Board has been given one year to develop a course for school resource officers as well as a process for granting waivers to specific individuals based on prior training and experience. Beginning January 1, 2021, any law enforcement agency providing a school resource officer must also provide that officer’s certificate of completion of the program or an approved waiver.

Board of Education

School Board Elections
Public Act 100-0800
Effective January 1, 2019
When a school board fills a vacancy due to a lack of candidates for election in a congressional township in the most recent election, the school board by resolution must order a proposition for the election of a board member at large be submitted to the school district’s voters at the next general election.

Oath of Office
Public Act 100-1055
Effective January 1, 2019
The oath of office for school board members will now include accepting responsibility for the equitable and quality education of every student, fostering extensive participation of the community, establishing a sound organizational framework, continuing assessment of student achievement, serving as a key advocate of students and schools, and striving toward fulfilling the board’s vision and achieving excellence.

Walking/Biking Education
Public Act 100-1056
Effective August 24, 2018
The school board of any district maintaining any of grades K-8 must adopt a policy on educating students on effective methods of preventing and avoiding traffic injuries walking and bicycling.

Administration

Mandate Waiver Notice
Public Act 100-0782
Effective January 1, 2019
School districts applying for a waiver or modification of School Code mandates are now permitted to notify the affected exclusive collective bargaining agent and the relevant State legislators of their intent to seek approval of a waiver or modification and of the public hearing electronically.

Local Government Electronic Notification Act
Public Act 100-0856
Effective January 1, 2019
While this new law allows counties and units of local government to provide all required notifications electronically to those who request it, the Act specifically excludes school districts.

Dual Credit Quality Act
Public Act 100-1049
Effective January 1, 2019
Upon request of a school district within its boundaries, community college districts must enter into partnership agreements to offer dual credit coursework.  The agreement must include the roles and responsibilities of the respective institutions, which dual credit courses the school district will offer and how those courses will be offered, the criteria for granting eligibility for dual credit coursework, any limitations on the availability of courses, the requirement that the dual credit instructor meet the applicable academic credential requirements, the collaborative process by which dual credit instructors will be selected, the requirement that the community college district ensure the dual credit courses are equivalent to its own courses, the fees and costs to be assessed by the community college district, and the requirement that the community college district establish a mechanism for evaluating and documenting student progress.  School districts are also prohibited from contracting with out-of-state institutions without first offering the community college district in which they are located the opportunity to provide courses.  Additional criteria are also established for instructors of dual credit courses.

Dual Credit
Public Act 100-0792
Effective January 1, 2019
Qualified students are eligible to enroll in an unlimited amount of dual credit courses and earn an unlimited amount of academic credits from dual credit courses provided that the courses are taught by an Illinois instructor.

Electronic-Learning Days Pilot Program
Public Act 100-0760
Effective August 10, 2018
The Electronic-Learning Days Program, which was originally set to expire after the 2017-2018 school year, no longer has a sunset provision.

Liquor Sales Near Schools
Public Act 100-0663
Effective August 2, 2018
The Liquor Control Act previously prohibited the issuance of liquor licenses for the retail sale of alcohol within 100 feet of any school, among other institutions. Under a new amendment, a local liquor commissioner may grant an exemption to that prohibition if a local rule or ordinance authorizes the commissioner to do so.

Human Trafficking Hotline
Public Act 100-0671
Effective January 1, 2019
The administrator of a public or private elementary school or secondary school must post a printout of a downloadable notice from the Department of Human Services in a conspicuous and accessible place in the administrative office or another location in view of school employees.  The notice encourages the reader to call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center if he or she, or someone they know, is being forced to engage in any activity and cannot leave. 

Curriculum

Parenting Education
Public Act 100-1043
Effective August 23, 2018
Beginning with the 2019-2020 school year, ISBE shall implement and administer a 3-year pilot program to support the health and wellness of student-learning by utilizing instruction on parenting education in districts that maintain grades 9 through 12. Further, this Act outlines the requirements of the program and allows the State Board to issue grants to school districts that apply to participate in the program.

Education on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault
Public Act 100-0684
Effective August 3, 2018
Course material and instruction in sex education courses must now include material and discussion on what constitutes sexual consent and what may be considered sexual harassment or sexual assault. Courses must place an emphasis on the workplace environment and life on a college campus.

Black History Curriculum
Public Act 100-0634
Effective January 1, 2019
School districts are permitted to meet the requirement that every public elementary and high school include a unit of instruction on Black History through an online program or course.

Transportation

Identification of School Buses
Public Act 100-0791
Effective January 1, 2019
When a school bus is used to transport passengers over the age of 18 other than in connection with an activity of the school or religious organization which owns the school bus, the “school bus” signs must be covered or concealed, and the stop signal arm and flashing signal shall not be used. When transporting passengers under the age of 18 outside of a school activity or in connection with a community based rehabilitation facility, buses must now display the “school bus” sign and use the stop signal flashing arm and flashing signal. Such buses must be operated by, or the driver must be accompanied and supervised for training purposes by, a person possessing a valid school bus driver permit.

Business and Finance

Evidence Based Funding
Public Act 100-0578
Effective January 31, 2018
The new school funding formula was amended to subtract the value of property tax abatements from the Local Capacity Calculation.  Specifically, the real property equalized assessed valuation for a school district will be adjusted by subtracting an amount computed by dividing the amount of any abatement by 3.00% for K-12 districts, 2.30% for K-8 districts, or 1.05% for high school districts.

Budget and Funding Distribution
Public Act 100-0587
Effective June 4, 2018
Beginning July 1, 2018 or as soon as practical thereafter, ISBE must identify to the Department of Revenue, school districts having Personal Property Tax Replacement Fund (“PPTRF”) receipts totaling 13% or more of their total revenues in fiscal year 2017. Any such school district identified by ISBE shall receive, in addition to its annual distributions from the PPTRF, 16% of the total amount distributed to the school district from the PPTRF during fiscal year 2017. However, the total amount of additional distributions shall not exceed $4,3000,000. If the total additional distributions do exceed $4,3000,000, the distributions will be calculated on a pro rata basis based on fiscal year 2017’s revenues.

Public Education Credit Card Affinity
Public Act 100-0621
Effective July 20, 2018
This omnibus Act included the repeal of the Illinois Public Education Affinity Credit Card Act which allowed holders of affinity credit cards to designate a specific school district to benefit from their use of the card.

Administrative Costs
Public Act 100-0807
Effective August 10, 2018
In Section 10-17a of the School Code, additional language has been inserted clarifying that a school district’s “administrative costs” as reported in ISBE’s report cards means the costs associated with executive, administrative, or managerial functions within the school district that involve planning, organizing, managing, or directing the school district.

Property Tax

Refunds for Erroneous Assessments
Public Act 100-1104
Effective August 27, 2018
For properties that were twice assessed, or assessed before it became taxable, the maximum amount of taxes and interest that may be refunded on claims that arose prior to 2009 has been doubled from $2.5 million to $5 million.

Life Care Facilities
Public Act 100-1077
Effective January 1, 2019
Beginning with the 2018 tax year, life care facilities will be entitled to a reduction in their equalized assessed value to the maximum amount of the general homestead exemption multiplied by the number of units in the facility for which the occupants are liable for paying the property taxes, regardless of the occupant’s legal interest in the property.

Pensions

Defined Contribution Plan
Public Act 100-0769
Effective August 10, 2018
As soon as practicable, TRS will begin offering an optional defined contribution plan to active members.  The defined contribution plan will collect contributions and offer investment options to the participant.  TRS must also produce an annual, public report on participation in the defined contribution plan.

Return to Work in Teacher Shortage Areas
Public Act 100-0743
Effective August 10, 2018
The sunset clause has been extended until June 30, 2019 for the provision of the Pension Code allowing retired TRS members to return to work in teacher shortage areas without impairing his or her retirement status or retirement annuity. 

Salaries Exceeding the Governor’s Salary
Public Act 100-0624
Effective July 20, 2018
The section of the Pension Code dealing with TRS members whose salaries exceed the Governor’s salary has been amended. The TRS member’s salary is no longer determined on a full-time equivalent basis.  The Governor’s salary is further defined as the salary set by law and in effect as of July 1 of the State’s fiscal year.  The amendment also changes the time period for calculating the amount of the TRS member’s salary from the school year to the State fiscal year.